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WEATHER REPORT (August 19, 2019): 

According to NJ State Climatologist David Robinson of Rutgers University, March 2019 was warmer and drier than last March 2018. Because of those conditions, our farmers were able to get their tilling & planting started on time this season.  “April was quite mild with the 54.7° average 3.8° above the 1981–2010 mean and ranked 4th mildest ever. Six of the top ten and nine of the top 20 mildest Aprils have occurred since 2002. Precipitation was about as average as can be.”  Dr. Robinson found that “As was seen earlier this spring, rainfall was quite persistent during a good portion of May. However, unlike April, it was not just a matter of frequency but ultimately, quantity that made for soggy conditions in the fifth month of 2019. The statewide average precipitation was 6.70”, which is 2.71” above the 1981–2010 mean. This made for the 9th wettest May since records commenced in 1895. The wet conditions were accompanied by above average temperatures. The 62.7° statewide average was 2.1° above the 1981–2010 mean. Our farmers were hampered in their field work, planting, and harvesting in May.  

Dr. Robinson found that July “as a whole was a wet one, averaging 6.02” across the state. This is 1.45” above the 1981–2010. Northern counties were wettest, averaging 7.16” or some 2.41” above normal. The south averaged 5.41”, which is 0.92” above normal. Ten of the past 12 months and 15 of the past 18 months have received above-average precipitation across the state. While the 12 months ending in January this year ranks as wettest (66.61”) of 1484 such intervals dating back to 1895, the past 12 month period ending in July comes in second place with 65.61”, just ahead of the 12 months ending in June (65.50”). The average statewide July temperature was 77.8°. This is 3.2° above the 1981–2010 mean and ranks as the 5th warmest since 1895 (tied with 2012 and 2013). Eleven of the 20 warmest Julys have occurred since 2002. Southern NJ averaged 78.8° which is 3.1° above normal and ranks 6th warmest (tied with 2013). The north averaged 76.3°, some 3.5° above normal and 3rd warmest. The excessive humidity throughout most of the month led to nighttime temperatures ranked as the 3rd warmest on record statewide (tied with 1901 and 2010), as a moist atmosphere inhibits the loss of the previous day’s heat during the overnight period.

Today’s mid-90’s finishes off a hot weekend. The next three days we’ll each see temperatures about 90° and thunderstorms before a cool front brings partly sunny skies and much cooler temperatures in the high 70’s for Friday through the weekend. Dr. Robinson found that July “as a whole was a wet one, averaging 6.02” across the state. This is 1.45” above the 1981–2010. Northern counties were wettest, averaging 7.16” or some 2.41” above normal. The south averaged 5.41”, which is 0.92” above normal. Ten of the past 12 months and 15 of the past 18 months have received above-average precipitation across the state. While the 12 months ending in January this year ranks as wettest (66.61”) of 1484 such intervals dating back to 1895, the past 12 month period ending in July comes in second place with 65.61”, just ahead of the 12 months ending in June (65.50”). The average statewide July temperature was 77.8°. This is 3.2° above the 1981–2010 mean and ranks as the 5th warmest since 1895 (tied with 2012 and 2013). Eleven of the 20 warmest Julys have occurred since 2002. Southern NJ averaged 78.8° which is 3.1° above normal and ranks 6th warmest (tied with 2013). The north averaged 76.3°, some 3.5° above normal and 3rd warmest. The excessive humidity throughout most of the month led to nighttime temperatures ranked as the 3rd warmest on record statewide (tied with 1901 and 2010), as a moist atmosphere inhibits the loss of the previous day’s heat during the overnight period. Please try to get out and enjoy a pick your own farm or one of the many roadside stands and community farmers markets that are held around the state. Find a market near you. 

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